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10 Most Common Interview Questions and How to Answer So You Get the Job

Remember taking exams in school? How many times did you think to yourself, “If only I knew what questions were going to be on the test, I could get an A.” Getting interviewed for a job is the equivalent of a verbal test. And if you know what questions you’ll be asked, then you can prepare and do well. Below are the 10 most common interview questions and guidance on how to approach answering them.

1. Tell me about yourself.

This interview question isn’t as open-ended as it sounds. The employer wants to know about your professional experience, so don’t launch into a lengthy discussion about personal subjects. Avoid disclosures such as age, marital status, hobbies, etc. as they’re not relevant at this point and can only serve to disqualify you from further consideration.

Instead, talk about your work and educational background. Use the information listed on your resume as potential talking points. Keep your answers to the point and watch how the interviewer responds. You can expound on those topics which seem to catch his or her interest.

2. Why did you choose to apply for this position?

You can answer this interview question easily if you’ve done your homework. Your research about the company should have provided specific details about the organization’s products, history, mission and philosophy, all of which can be reasons you chose to apply for the position.

The interviewer is really asking why you should be considered for the job. So use your past work or educational experiences to show that you are a good fit and would be an asset to the company.

Don’t mention salary, even if that happens to be the real reason you’re applying for the job. Employers want people who are excited about the work and the company. Money shouldn’t appear to be your primary motivator.

3. What are your strengths?

The interviewer is giving you permission to toot your own horn, so don’t be too modest. Focus on those strengths that the company would value such as communication and leadership skills. You can also talk about your ability to problem-solve, handle stress and get along well with others. Ideally, you want to also supply an example or two that demonstrate these strengths.

4. What are your weaknesses or areas of development?

The obvious answer would be to say you have no weaknesses, but your answer won’t sound believable. Let’s face it; everyone has areas that could use some improvement.

Of course, you also don’t want to give the employer a weakness that’s so significant as to disqualify you as a candidate. The best way to get out of this question is to use a weakness that may also be viewed as a strength.

For example, “I need to get better at delegating. Often, I try to do everything myself, and that’s not always the best use of my time.”

Another tactic is to explain how you’re working to overcome your weakness. For example, “I’m not as familiar as I should be with Photoshop software. Lately, I’ve been doing online tutorials to improve my technical skills.”

A different strategy is to mention a minor flaw, such as, “I can be too outspoken at times, but I’m working on choosing my words more carefully and being more diplomatic.”

5. Why did you leave your last job?

Employers are often curious about your past situation because it can be a good indicator of how you’ll perform in the future in a new job. The best approach is to be honest, but upbeat, and don’t give unnecessary detail.

If you were laid off, say that you wish you could have stayed, but that you understand that sometimes businesses must make difficult decisions when times are tough.

Resist the temptation to bad-mouth your previous employer. Any negativity will seem unprofessional, even if your statements are valid.

You can say that you appreciated the opportunities you had at your last job and you hope your next job will give you similar chances to grow. If possible, share some specific examples of how your prior employer allowed you to develop your abilities.

6. Are you competitive?

While some people might think it’s best to answer “no” to this interview question, many companies do value a competitive nature, especially if you’re applying for a sales position. As long as you don’t come across as ruthless or combative, a competitive spirit is an asset.

One way to answer this question is: “I can be competitive, but I’m also a team player. I’ve worked in groups and recognize that what we accomplished was far greater than what I could have done on my own.”

7. What do you like to do in your spare time?

This interview question provides you with an opportunity to show your personality. You can describe your hobbies and interests. Of course, avoid mentioning any activities that could be considered controversial or immoral. Also steer clear of any subjects that could cause the interviewer concern about your commitment to the job, such as your all-encompassing care of an elderly relative or your dedication to competing in marathons around the country.

8. How do you handle stress?

Nearly every job involves some sort of pressure. The employer wants to know if you’re going to rise to the challenge or run out the door screaming when things get tense. The best way to answer this question is to say that you handle stress well. But don’t leave it at that. Provide a specific example of how you handled a stressful situation. The story you tell will serve as evidence of your cool under fire and your problem-solving ability.

9. What are your salary expectations?

This is a tough question because you don’t want to give a number so high that you knock yourself out of contention for the job. And you don’t want to give a low number that essentially leaves money on the table.

Prior to the interview, you should have done some research to determine the going rate for the open position. You can be sure the employer has done so.

If possible, try to get the employer to throw out the first figure. If the employer is vague or evasive in answering, then give a range of your salary expectations based on your credentials and knowledge of the field.

10. Do you have any questions for me?

Asking questions of the employer shows your interest. It’s also your opportunity to find out more about the company and the individual position so you can decide if it’s right for you. Be sure your questions reflect substance. Don’t ask something trivial like how long your lunch break will be.

You should prepare a few questions in advance based on your research of the company prior to your interview such as: What is the size of the company in terms of sales volume and number of employees? What are the company’s strengths compared to its competition? And, what are the main responsibilities of the position?

In answering any interview questions, keep in mind that the employer is trying to learn more about your skills, experience and personality to decide if you are a fit for the open position. To be likeable, make good eye contact and wear a pleasant expression throughout your meeting. Listen with interest to the interviewer and comment appropriately. Be a natural, but professional version of your true self, and you stand a good chance of getting a job offer.

Source by Susan Greene

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How to Control Stress Eating

The last few years were stressful ones for me. As a result, for the first time in my life, I got into the habit of stress eating.

I’m referring to the routine of emotional, mindless eating and snacking. Stuffing myself with junk food, not to fill my stomach, but because I’m bored, stressed from everyday life, overwhelmed, or exhausted.

To make matters worse, sometimes I’m eating without paying attention to the food or really enjoying it. Suddenly, I crave chocolate or chips or pizza and nothing else sounds good. So, I woof it down while watching TV, reading a book, or playing on my iPad. The need to eat isn’t coming from my stomach but from inside my head. I don’t eat until I’m full but until I’m uncomfortable.

Sometimes I start off with good intentions and eat something healthy like veggies but I still can’t get those darn chips off my brain. Not satisfied, I eat a huge bowl of popcorn thinking that will do the trick. I’m full, but I can’t quit thinking about those nachos I wanted in the first place. So I end up eating the veggies, popcorn, AND the nachos. My stomach is so full and bloated, I end up feeling downright miserable. In my twisted mind, I convince myself I should just go for the nachos next time instead of all those extra calories I ate before eating what I really craved. So that’s what I do.

Briefly, I feel better, but then I feel disgusted with myself.

Sound familiar?

So what can we all do to stop stress eating and avoid the dreaded unwanted weight gain that usually results? Here are some simple tips I plan on using:

Identify Emotions and Triggers

Take comfort, stress eating isn’t all your fault and actually has a logical reason behind it.

When you feel stressed out, your body produces high levels of the hormone cortisol. Cortisol increases your appetite and triggers cravings for salty, high-carb, sweet, and high-fat foods. These foods give you a burst of energy and pleasure by increasing the brain’s feel-good dopamine response. Over time, your brain may start to depend on these comfort foods to calm down and feel better.

In addition, if you’re not sleeping at night because you’re anxious, that only makes the problem worse. And if your life feels unfulfilled and empty, food may fill a void.

So, the first step is to figure out what is making you reach for that bag of chips. Does your life feel out of control? Are you frustrated? Overwhelmed? Mad? Anxious?

Focus on the real issues at hand and you’ll be ready for the next step.

Learn to Accept Your Feelings

Often, we eat to avoid feelings that make us uncomfortable. Food is a nice distraction sometimes.

If you’re stressed out about your job or financial pressures, worried about an upcoming event, or stewing over an argument you had with a loved one, it’s usually easier to focus on eating comfort foods instead of dealing with the painful situation.

The emotions won’t go away, however. If you stress eat, you’ll also add the burden of guilt for sabotaging your weight loss goals. This starts a whole cycle – and not a good one. Your emotions trigger you to overeat, you beat yourself up for ruining your diet, you gain weight, feel even more guilty, and then overeat again to try and make yourself feel better.

So, give yourself permission to feel angry, fearful, anxious, guilty, or exhausted. Invite those negative feelings in to visit and accept them with kindness. Eventually, your body and mind will come to understand that these feelings are okay. That you don’t need to comfort yourself with food to protect you from your own emotions.

The truth is when you don’t try and suppress negative feelings – even if they are painful – it will help you quit obsessing over your emotions. Your feelings will lose their power over you. You’ll learn to control your anxiety and deal with negative feelings in more constructive ways.

As a bonus, when you listen to and accept your feelings, you’ll discover what it is you truly need and then make necessary changes in your life.

Pause for a Moment

Take a moment to stop and reflect on why you want to eat. Tell yourself that you’ll put off eating for just five minutes. During that time, you’ll give yourself the chance to make a different choice than reaching for that bag of chips.

Ask yourself how you’re feeling. Understand what is motivating your need to eat and think of a better way to address those feelings. (See the section below for some ideas on positive ways to deal with negative emotions.)

However, if you still really, really want a bowl of ice cream, it may be better to indulge in moderation. As I learned from my experience as related in the beginning of this article, eating a bunch of veggies and rice cakes when you really want some chips or chocolate won’t work in the long run.

“Reach for something you don’t really want, and you’re likely to eat more of it because it isn’t satisfying,” explains Michelle May, MD, author of Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat. So, go ahead and indulge, but step away from that laptop, TV, or iPad, so you can focus fully on the treat you want to eat. Why? If you don’t take a moment to enjoy everything about it, “then the real reason you’re eating it won’t be served,” she says, and you’ll be more likely to give in to other high-calorie foods-not to mention more of them.

Even if you give into temptation and eat something you shouldn’t, you’ll better understand why you’re turning to food for comfort. Maybe you can react differently the next time cravings hit.

Find Alternatives

Once you understand the cycle of stress eating and some of your triggers, find other constructive ways to deal with your emotions.

If you’re stressed out, turn on some favorite music and dance around the house. Take a brisk walk. Write in a journal. Do something creative like painting or scrapbooking. Practice deep breathing until you feel calm. Get outside and enjoy nature.

If you’re feeling depressed or lonely, call a good friend or family member, pet your dog or cat, or look through an old photo album. If you’re angry, practice the healing art of forgiveness. If you’re bored, plan your next trip or start filling your calendar with exciting events. If you’re exhausted, treat yourself to a soothing cup of tea or a long bath with scented candles.

It also helps to take positive steps to tackle issues that may be bothering you. For example, if financial problems are weighing you down, start implementing constructive strategies toward paying down debt or saving for retirement.

Keep in mind, negative emotions don’t typically last forever. Just because you’re miserable today doesn’t mean you’ll be unhappy tomorrow. But in the meantime, find alternative healthy and positive ways to deal with your emotions.

Pay Attention to What You Eat

Stay away from mindless eating and really appreciate your food.

When shopping, think about the nutritional value of the food you’re buying and how it will make your body stronger. Try out some new healthy recipes. When you’re cooking, use all your senses to appreciate the aroma, texture, color, and even the sounds of the food as you cook them.

And when it’s time to eat, take time to enjoy your food fully. Take small bites, chew slowly, and appreciate all the ingredients, tastes, and seasonings. You’ll be surprised at all the flavors packed into one bite when you do so.

Start Each Day Anew

Finally, be kind to yourself. If you have a setback and indulge in stress eating, start over the next day. Learn from your experience and plan on how you can prevent it from happening again. Focus on the constructive changes you’re making in your eating habits that will improve your health.

And go ahead and indulge every once in a while. Just take the time to truly savor it.

So, there you go. Next time, I get the urge to stress eat, I’m following the steps I’ve outlined above. How about you? Join me and we can combat stress eating together!

Source by Julie Gorges

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How Advertising and Marketing Got Started

Advertising, as we know it, probably started to prosper in 1904 when John E. Kennedy gave the world that definition: Advertising is Salesmanship-in-Print. A definition that has not been bettered since and many have tried.

But modern day advertising started a few years earlier than Kennedy when Richard Sears produced the very first mail order catalog (around 1892). This catalog contained hundreds of pages of articles for sale and each with their own sales copy. And Sears Roebuck is still going strong today, in marketing and sales.

Around this time, advertising agencies sprang up everywhere. And the people they employed and trained, left us with such treasures that all top marketers today display in their resource libraries and use to their advantage.

Shortly after Kennedy arrived on the scene, Claude Hopkins came along. He left us with a legacy we should all thank him for. He pioneered market testing, sampling, vouchers, and a whole lot more.

At the turn of the last century there were many others: Walter Dill Scott, Maxwell Sackheim, Haldeman Julius, John Caples, to name just four.

Then around the middle of the century such geniuses as Elmer Wheeler, Robert Collier and other contemporaries appeared.

Post war, advertising greats David Ogilvy, Joe Karbo, and Gary Halbert also made their mark.

And living legends Jay Abraham, John Carlton, Dan Kennedy, and Ted Nicholas, have all made many millions both for themselves and their clients.

Towards the end of the last century, the greatest marketing tool of all time was unleashed on the world – the Internet. Early pioneer of the Internet, Ken McCarthy, is still around and his “System” seminars are an absolute must attend.

The Internet has opened a whole new world for advertising and marketing. And a new breed of entrepreneur has been born. Guys like the late, great Corey Rudl, Marlon Sanders, Robert Imbriale, Yanik Silver, Jim Edwards and many others have shown what can be done and in such a short space of time.

But one thing all these “gurus” have in common is that they have studied the markets. They have studied the psychology of what makes people buy. They have learned these principles from the great masters of the past the John Kennedy’s, the Claude Hopkins, the Walter Dill Scott’s, the Elmer Wheeler’s.

And that’s what my articles are all about.

You will be taken from the very beginnings of advertising and get an insight into the writings, the ideas and the philosophies of most of the greatest marketers that ever lived.

For sure, you will recognise much of the material that is mentioned as we take the “tour” but it’s doubtful that you will have come across all of it.

All top marketers recommend that you continually add to your education and you will not do better than picking up any (or all) of the material that you will be exposed to on your “tour.”

Each manuscript mentioned in this “tour” is a desirable addition for your resource library.

Pick them up, maybe one at a time. And you will profit from them just like all the great masters have done past and present.

This article is a brief history of events leading up to the appearance of John E. Kennedy in 1904.

But it also highlights a few milestones in advertising.

1704 The first newspaper ad appeared. It was in a Boston Newsletter and sought a buyer for an estate in Oyster Bay, Long Island.

1729 Benjamin Franklin starts to publish the Pennsylvania Gazette in Philadelphia which included ads.

1742 America’s first magazine ads published by Benjamin Franklin in General Magazine.

1784 America’s first successful daily newspaper, the Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser, starts in Philadelphia.

1833 Benjamin Day publishes the first successful “penny” newspaper, The Sun. Circulation reached 30,000 by 1837 which made it the largest in the world.

1843 Volney Palow opens the first ad agency in Philadelphia.

1868 Francis Wayland Ayer opens N. W. Ayer and Sons in Philadelphia with just $250.

His first clients include Montgomery Ward, John Wannamaker Dept. Stores, Singer Sewing machines, and Pond’s beauty cream.

1873 The first convention for ad agencies held in New York.

1877 J.W. Thompson buys Culter and Smith from William J. Carlton and pays $500 for the business and $800 for the office furniture.

1880 Department Store founder John Wanamaker becomes first retailer to employ a full-time advertising copywriter John E. Powers.

Wannamaker makes famous statement: half my advertising is waste, I just don’t know which half.

1881 Daniel M. Lord and Ambrose L. Thomas form Lord and Thomas in Chicago.

1881 Procter and Gamble advertise Ivory Soap with an enormous budget of $11,000.

1886 N.W. Ayer promotes advertising with the slogan: Keeping everlastingly at it brings success.

1886 Richard Warren Sears became the world’s first direct marketer.

1891 George Batten and Co. opens.

1892 NW Ayer hires first full-time copywriter.

1892 Sears Roebuck formed.

1893 Printer’s Ink founded by George P. Rowell. A magazine that serves as the little schoolmaster in the art of advertising.

1898 N.W Ayer helps National Biscuit Co. launch the first pre-packaged biscuit Uneeda.

1899 Campbell Soup makes its first advertising.

1899 JWT becomes the first agency to open an office in London. 1900 N .W. Ayer establishes a business-getting department to plan ad campaigns.

1904 John E. Kennedy bursts onto the scene to change the face of advertising forever.

My next article will continue with the evolution of advertising as we know it.

Mail order guru Ted Nicholas said that the old marketers were the best and that they, and the works they produced, should be studied – he did!

Source by Peter Woodhead

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Marketing Mix – 4 Pricing Strategy Alternatives

Pricing is an important part of your marketing mix strategies. Pricing can help or hinder your product or service sales. Given that your product is good quality, that it has the features and benefits that your buyers want and need, that it is differentiated from your competition, and that it has a good cost structure and a good, strong promotion and distribution program, your pricing strategy for your product or service can help you sell it, or not. Pricing strategies can have a very direct impact on growing your market share.

Four alternative pricing strategiess for your business are:

  • Generic or economy pricing. This strategy treats generic or economy-type brands with a low price – the value to the buyer is in the low price. Your business approach to this pricing strategy must be rooted in a low cost structure, minimal features, minimal promotion but still solid (not extravagant) benefits.
  • Differential Pricing. With this strategy, you might choose to price your product differently by buyer type (e.g. retail store, online store, a department store), by geographic region (e.g. the California market might be higher priced than Illinois), by volume purchased (e.g. a customer buying a large volume would receive a different price than one buying a small volume), by national account segment (e.g. you might negotiate special differential pricing with a national account versus the price you would charge to a local account). With all of these differential prices, there must be a justifiable reason for the price differences.
  • Premium Pricing. This strategy is commonly used for luxury items or high end, high value goods, such as expensive jewellery, boats, planes, estates, etc. Only use this strategy if your product’s value is recognized by your market as being a premium or luxury good.
  • Captive Product or Companion Product Pricing. This pricing strategy is also used in product line pricing. This strategy bundles, and usually packages, like products together to be priced as companions (for example, a mixer and a mixing bowl) and as captives (for example, pens that have to have a specific refill (not generic), razors that can only use a specific blade, etc.). Captive or Companion product pricing often relies on packaging to offer the two products in one package (for example, a trial pack of blades with the razor; one pen refill packaged with the pen; or the tape refill with the tape dispenser). Then when those blades, refills or other companion products are used, the price to buy new blades, refills or other products is significantly higher than the original priced package.

Thoroughly analyze your product, your buyers, your competitors (and their possible actions and reactions), and your market before you decide which pricing strategy would best-fit your business. Then review pricing strategy by product, and by product line, on a regular basis to make sure that the fit remains the best.

Source by Kris Bovay

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Use of Steroids

Steroid

Steroids are chemical compounds consisting of three fused benzene rings that are fused together and are arranged in a specific way. Steroids are often taken as drugs for therapeutic and ergogenic purposes. They are official known as Anabolic Androgen Steroids (AAS) in the United States. Anabolic steroids were first synthesized and studied in 1932.

Natural steroids are produced in the body from cholesterol taken in by diet. Other steroids are testosterone, dihydrotestoseterone, estrogen, cortisol and progesterone. These have various functions in human body related to gender. These steroids also produce anabolism in the body and testosterone control masculine features of human body.

Anabolic Steroids

Anabolic steroids are a type of steroid that we commonly known as just ‘steroids’. These steroids are synthetic steroids which imitate the effect of natural counterparts. They promote protein production. Use of Anabolic steroids increases growth rate of bone and muscle tissues. It increases appetite and masculine features in the body.

It alters the natural testosterone production in the body. Limbic hair growth increases. Voice of the host deepens and becomes more masculine. Facial hair and pubic hair grow faster, puberty occurs quickly, before age. In females facial hair start to appear and their voice becomes less feminine over time.

Steroids in Sports

Steroids are sometimes used by athletes and sportsmen to enhance their performance in very short span of time. Use of steroids increase their stamina and capabilities. For sportsmen these drugs work like dream. There are numerous by which Anabolic steroids can be taken; first and the most widely used one is taking them orally. Secondly liquid steroid are taken by injection into the muscles. Third way is via skin patches, which slowly release the drug in blood through skin

Steroids for sale are not available from drug stores easily. Its use has been banned by most professional sports clubs and organizations. Although, some of the sports related organization allow their use in small doses under supervision of physicians.

Steroids for sale

Steroids are illegal to use for sportsmen taking part in international sports events, like Olympics. Their use is considered cheated by the international communities. This is due to the fact that after using steroids, one can make super human records.

Sale of steroids is banned in some parts of the world but their effects on the body make them very desirable for sports personnel and body builders. They are often sold in the black market. There are also drugs that are counterfeit but are sold at high prices due the demand.

One can also buy steroids on internet quite easily.

Side Effects of Steroids

Steroids are proves to be very harmful to health. They create many health complications even at very young age. These include hypertension (unusually high blood pressure), appearance of acne marks of face. Presence of high amounts of steroids in body can trigger early hair fall in male and female alike.

These side effects of anabolic steroids are due to prolonged use of high dose. If used in a controlled manner they are very useful. They are also used for curing disease. Use of even minor quantities by sportsmen is banned in international sports community. This act is called doping in sports.

Source by Tina Garrett

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